CNUF announces plans for in-person festival in 2022

    Kateryna Bandura for New Pathway – Ukrainian News.

    After two years of virtual performances, Canada’s National Ukrainian Festival began preparations for in-person activities for the 2022 festival in Dauphin, MB.

    “We would like to extend our sincere gratitude to all our patrons, volunteers, performers, entertainers, staff, vendors and sponsors for your continuous support for the Festival,” said Kayla Gillis, President of Canada’s National Ukrainian Festival, in a statement. “Without all your support, the festival would not be possible, and we would not be able to carry on the Ukrainian culture.”

    Tickets have been made available for purchase on January 6, along with weekend passes, camping passes and early bird pricing. A list of entertainment acts will be released later this month.

    CNUF also held a Cash Calendar fundraiser in December, with additional prizes to be won daily throughout January. Winners will be contacted by phone after the daily draw is completed. All funds raised will be going towards producing the 2022 Festival. Since the 2022 festival will be capped at half-capacity, only about 5,000 tickets are available.

    “It’s been two years where we had a virtual program that was featured online on our YouTube and Facebook page,” Gillis said. “It almost feels like we’re planning the first festival again, kind of starting from scratch and bringing out some new things while following all protocols and regulations from the government.”

    The festival was held online for the past two years due to COVID-19. The organizers received a robust response from past performers providing videos from previous occasions. Other performers hosted live performances while socially distancing and wearing masks.

    This year, the festival will be held on July 29-31.

    “We are currently working very closely with Manitoba Public Health to ensure that all those in attendance experience a wonderful cultural experience. We also want to ensure that all of our Festival patrons, performers and volunteers are safe while on site,” Gillis said.

    Gillis said that it was devastating to see in-person events postponed during the pandemic for the first time in more than 50 years. While it was a difficult decision, ensuring the safety of patrons and performers remained the top priority for festival organizers, she said.

    “We took a hit financially with not being able to have a festival for two years as we are a non-profit foundation, and all our funds come from government grants or from our annual festival,” Gillis said. “We’re hoping that we’re able to have a good year going into 2022 and get things back on track.”

    Festival organizers are carefully monitoring all protocols as they are subject to change.

    This article is written under the Local Journalism Initiative agreement